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By the end of the day, she was telling her story to police.

Nearly two years later, she has joined an unhappy chorus of voices critical of how universities handle sexual assault reports.

Related: How the Free Press produced campus assault series Ashley — her story backed by university documents inspected by the Free Press — felt she had the worst hangover ever but couldn't remember why.

The 18-year-old sophomore remembered drinking three shots the night before, but why had that wrecked her so much? Why did she have a fleeting memory of a male student standing over her? The 2013 fall semester at MSU was just getting under way and Ashley spent the rest of that day becoming increasingly convinced she had been raped.

Up until now dating apps, not to be confused with online dating websites, have had a male heavy demographic—that is, until Tinder came along.

Tinder is the latest in a slew of location based hook-up partner finding apps that use GPS to locate future sex-mates. But, it's different than Blendr, the other "Grindr for straight people," and the dozens of others of dating apps out there in one critical aspect: women are actually using it.

Tinder's founders bragged to us about the number of female users when it launched last October, and though they didn't have fresh numbers, the app has received a lot of vocal approval from women online, including female tech writer Jenna Wortham, who says "there’s something about Tinder’s simple, flirty interface that is undeniably fun." This acceptance might have something to do with the fact that unlike every other hook-up app out there, which were birthed by men, as Ann Friedman notes in So far hook-up apps haven't catered to women because they lack certain protections that the XX-demographic likes when meeting potential sexual partners, argues Friedman: "women want authenticity, privacy, a more controlled environment, and a quick path to a safe, easy offline meeting." Perhaps because of its single female voice, Tinder offers a lot of those things mostly by way of Facebook.

The app syncs up with the social network in a "cleverly discreet" way, as Wortham puts it.

Tottering home across the East Lansing campus, Ashley frequently stopped to get her balance, wondering if she would fall off a bridge into the Red Cedar River.Here's how: Authenticity: Facebook's vehemence when it comes to real names and (general) culture of actual identities ensures that what you see is what you get."It connects through your Facebook so it made me feel a little more secure with the people being real," admitted Her Campus's Meghan Cramer while reviewing the app.It uses all the data and information people put into the social network, without broadcasting anything to the rest of the social network.With that, the app "successfully manages to decrease the creepiness of communicating with strangers ten-fold," write two women on NYU Local.Michigan State University, for example, requires staff to call police immediately upon receiving a report of a sexual assault, but the University of Michigan leaves the question of police involvement to the survivors. Someone charged with rape through the criminal justice system can face jail or prison time and a lifetime on a public sexual offender registry, while an accused student taken through the university administrative process may be ordered to write a 500-word essay or, at worst, be expelled.

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